Puerto Rican Tostones and Don’t Believe Everything You Read

Hello all 15 million of my subscribers (Ha! Ha! I wish).  I’ve been feeling very tired and yucky the past few weeks. But now, returned to health, I have several exciting recipes to share with you.

One of these is tostones, without which no repertoire of Latin dishes is complete. Tostones are fried patties made from green plantains, a large banana common throughout Latin America. Green plantains are not sweet and are eaten as a vegetable, much like a potato. They are readily available in grocery stores. This week’s quick, easy-to-make recipe is from Saveur, an excellent cooking magazine and a reliable source of recipes.

Which brings me to my second point. Some sources are not reliable, including books in print. For instance, in search of new Latin recipes, I went to my local public library and checked out a book called Caribbean Cooking. I saw a recipe for banana fudge and thought it would be fun to make. The recipe said to mash 3 bananas, add 3/4 cup of sugar, 1 tablespoon of margarine, 1 teaspoon of vanilla, simmer it on the stove for a few minutes, then let it cool and cut it into squares.

It made this liquid slop that couldn’t possibly be cut into squares and, with 3/4 of a cup of sugar, was so sickeningly sweet it was inedible. The “fudge” went down the garbage disposal. Another time I saw a recipe for green gazpacho in The Wall Street Journal. That sounds really good, I thought. So I made it. It was horrible. Maybe the Journal didn’t test the recipe before it went to press?

So while it may have been unrealistic to expect culinary expertise from The Wall Street Journal, I think you get my point, dear readers. Don’t believe everything you see in print.

In cooking, as in every other topic, rely on reputable sources as much as possible. Major cooking magazines such as Sunset, Bon Appetit, and Saveur have test kitchens in which they rigorously test their recipes before publishing them. And of course Doña Tina always tests her recipes.

So enjoy the tostones! They go great with rice and beans!

DSCN0685

Dipping Sauce
3–4 cloves garlic, peeled and crushed
salt to taste
3–6 cilantro sprigs, chopped
1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil

Tostones
3 green plantains
canola oil
salt

First, make the dipping sauce. Add garlic to the olive oil, then crush with a pestle until it makes a kind of paste. Add cilantro, and crush the leaves and stems. Salt the dipping sauce to taste and set aside.

Peel the plantains. Cut both ends off the plantains, then with a knife, make a few slits in the skin all the way down. Remove the skin and any fibers sticking to the plantain. Cut the plantains into 1-inch slices.

Add canola oil to a large, heavy frying pan to a depth of about 1 inch. Heat the oil on medium until a candy thermometer inserted in the oil reads 325 degrees. Working in 2 batches, fry the plantain slices about 1 1/2 minutes on each side, then drain on paper towels.

With a spatula or potato masher, press the slices down until they are half their original width. Fry them again in the oil for about a minute each side, until the tostones are golden brown.

Drain on paper towels, and season to taste with salt. Serve hot with the dipping sauce.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Advertisements